The Art of Being Social

November 26th, 2012

The Art of Being Socialby Karla Peppas

I grew up in Mississippi, where the women are Southern Belles with good manners and know how to shoot a shotgun. The other thing Southern women know how to do is spread the news. Word spreads fast if someone has a new love interest, knows about a special sale or has a juicy piece of gossip! Read the rest of this entry »

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Power to the … Movie Studios?

August 22nd, 2012
Last week Google implemented a change in how it determines search results that could have profound implications for a large variety of websites. Google announced that it was changing how it determined search results for certain sites in order to keep pirated or illegal content from its results. These changes are being heralded by many as giving too much power to copyright holders, and an example of what some claim as Google’s increasing willingness to give power to copyright holders over individual websites.
Basically, Google is now taking into consideration how many “valid copyright removal notices” it receives for a particular site when compiling search results. It’s important to note that copyright removal notices are basically a form of complaint that anyone can easily file. In many cases, removal notices are filed with Google for a variety of reasons that may be considered “valid” by Google, but are not “valid” according to law.
For example: Let’s say you’re running a blog that covers the goofy wardrobe choices of news anchors on a local TV station. In one post, you share a screen shot of a recent broadcast as a reference for your critique of what the anchor was wearing. From a technical perspective, that TV broadcast (and all images contained therein) belong to the news station. Fair Use law allows you to post the image, even though it is copyrighted, because you are referencing it for a “journalistic” purpose. But the local news station may not see it that way.
The local station may decide that it doesn’t like you making fun of its anchors, and starts a campaign to drown your site in copyright complaints. By doing so, Google will see a bunch of complaints related to your website, and may eventually stop showing your site in search results.- even though the complaints are based on a misinterpretation or misunderstanding of the law.
What Google has done in this case, in essence, is give the power to take down your website to the local news station. Over time, this makes Google even more vulnerable to gaming, especially by heavy-handed rights owners like movie studios and record labels.
Now Google says it will only consider “valid” complaints, but won’t explain how it determines what a “valid” complaint is. Additionally, some of Google’s own properties, like YouTube, are exempt from this filtering.
Google is always making changes and responding to user demand- so hopefully in this case, enough noise will be made to incite a change in this practice. In the meantime, we’ll have to trust that Google is doing the right thing and sticking by it’s famous mantra “Don’t Be Evil”.

Google Changes by South Central Mediaby Daniel Hadaway

Last week Google implemented a change in how it determines search results that could have profound implications for a large variety of websites. Google announced that it was changing how it determined search results for certain sites in order to keep pirated or illegal content from its results. These changes are being heralded by many as giving too much power to copyright holders, and an example of what some claim as Google’s increasing willingness to give power to copyright holders over individual websites.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Pick the Best Marketing Medium for Your Business

December 20th, 2011

Social Consumer Infographicby Daniel Hadaway

If you’re planning to begin marketing your business online, there’s a chance you’ve got a plan laid out for all the different types of marketing you’d like to utilize. It’s important to note, however, that while most businesses will see success from all online marketing channels, different types of online marketing lend themselves more favorably to specific vertical markets.

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Filed under: Display Advertising, Marketing, Online Reputation, Paid Search, SEO, Social Media, Web Design | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

What I Learned Today from a Facebook Post …

December 15th, 2011

South_Central_Media_Golden_Voice

by Marcus Snyder

The year is almost over and that can only mean one thing – list season. Every one who is anyone is busy creating their lists of 2011 and Facebook is no exception as they recently posted the 40 Most Shared Articles in 2011.

Most of the headlines jumped out as being extremely familiar. After all, who could forget the announcement of the 13th Zodiac Sign or the homeless man with a golden-voice? Not me. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Marketing, Online Reputation, Social Media | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Google Maps + Advertising = ?

November 29th, 2011

by Marcus Snyder

Consider this: When potential customers look up your business online and see your Google Maps listing, they’re hit with a promotional ad for your services. Genius, right? Well, maybe.

This hypothetical can easily become a reality as Google Adwords recently extended their reach to include their Google Maps service. It’s time to gather your marketing team because with the right approach, there’s a lot of potential here for your business. However, while you’re doing that, you might want to gather your public relations team, too.

So, what could possibly go wrong? The short answer is: everything. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Marketing, Online Reputation, Paid Search, PR | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment »

A Scientific Approach to Facebook

August 23rd, 2011

by Marcus Snyder

What time of day should I post? How long should my status messages be? Is it okay to ask followers to like something?

These are just a few of the question that every page administrator faces daily. There are a lot of “best practices” floating around out there that helps with these inquiries, however, there isn’t a whole lot of data to back them up … until now.

The people over at Momentus Media analyzed the top 20,000 Facebook pages to find out which posting techniques really work and placed their findings online for the entire world to see. For each analysis, they dissected 10,000 – 250,000 posts to find out exactly what drives interaction, and more importantly, how to replicate it.

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How to Deal with Negative Comments About Your Company

August 18th, 2011
How to Deal with Negative Comments About Your Company
It really is an inevitability: At some point in the life of your business there is bound to be someone who has a bad thing or two to say about your company. Even if you always do everything right, someone isn’t going to like you, and they’ll be determined to tell the world about it.
More often than not, the first place people go when they have something negative to say about a company these days is Twitter. Of course, they do this because all of their friends are on Twitter, but they also do this because they know your company is most likely on Twitter too!
Twitter (and social media at a higher level) have become the main medium for expressing dissatisfaction with a company or brand. So you need to be prepared to deal with the negative posts when they start showing up. Here are a couple of ideas for how to do that:
Address the issue in private, and ask the poster to remove the negative post.
Finding a way to address a customer’s complaint via the medium he or she used to express that complaint can do a lot to solve negative feedback. Doing this says “We’re paying attention to you and your criticism and will meet you where you are to resolve this for you.”
Once you’ve resolved the issue, it may be appropriate to ask the person to remove the negative post. This should only be done when you perceive the original post to contain factual inaccuracies or exaggerations about your business. The idea is not to erase the incident from existence, but to ensure the truth is being told about your brand. If someone says “I came to XY Restaurant yesterday and my sandwich was horrible”, you should leave it be.
In situations like the one above where it is not appropriate to ask someone to remove a negative post, you should encourage him or her to create a second post, highlighting the positive outcome and how you addressed their complaint. In the above scenario it may be “Big thanks to XY Restaurant for contacting me and giving me 2 free lunches in the future, in order to make it up to me!”
Many times addressing the issue directly can turn a negative into an eve bigger positive!
Provide an alternative location for customers to voice complaints.
It never hurts to attempt to prevent a negative comment from being posted about your brand in the first place. Create a page on your site, and link to it from your social media profiles, that is dedicated to accepting critiques and feedback from your customers.
Many times this will be enough to encourage the customer to communicate via this direct channel as opposed to a public social media post.
Of course, once you receive the negative feedback via this page/form, make sure to address it! Customer service is still important to your customers and your business, so don’t neglect it!
One thing to never do: Get into a public argument.
The last thing you want as a brand is have your audience become polarized by a public battle with a disgruntled customer. Avoid confrontation in public like (insert scary disease here)! No one wants to see that in their social media feed and it won’t turn out good for you, no matter what!
Negative critiques of your business will eventually happen. It’s important to keep an eye on what’s being said about your brand and stay proactive! Stay on top social media platforms and communities and remember: Your reputation exists whether you choose to control it or not!

by Daniel Hadaway

It really is an inevitability: At some point in the life of your business there is bound to be someone who has a bad thing or two to say about your company. Even if you always do everything right, someone isn’t going to like you, and they’ll be determined to tell the world about it.

More often than not, the first place people go when they have something negative to say about a company these days is Twitter. Of course, they do this because all of their friends are on Twitter, but they also do this because they know your company is most likely on Twitter too!

Twitter (and social media at a higher level) have become the main medium for expressing dissatisfaction with a company or brand. So you need to be prepared to deal with the negative posts when they start showing up. Here are a couple of ideas for how to do that:

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Online Reputation, PR, SEO, Social Media | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Is Your Business a Good Online Employee?

June 21st, 2011

by Daniel Hadaway

FlashXML.net wrote an interesting (and useful) blog about the reasons employers look at your Facebook account.

The article lists 10 reasons that are unique in some ways, but all pretty much boil down to this: Are you an honest, upright person? To put it another way: Are you the kind of person that employers want working for them?

This article got me thinking, and not about my secret life as a lip-dub star and the voice behind the Bronx Zoo Cobra Twitter account. No, it got me thinking about how your business is no different than an employee in this article. And your employer is every person who has ever considered doing business with you.

Think about that… Every person… Ever.

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Filed under: Blogging, Content, Online Reputation, PR, Social Media | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment »